Friday, January 18, 2008

How Corporations Enforce Political Correctness: Citicorp Refuses To Process Firearms Transactions And Seizes CDNN Sports Inc. Funds


The neocons on the right work in a de facto alliance with neo-Marxists on the left to clamp down the vise-like grip of political correctness upon America. While the neo-Marxists use culture as their weapon, imposing feminism, homosexuality, elective abortion, environmental extremism, and anti-white racism on the population, the neocons employ economic warfare.

But one reason the neocons of 21st century America do not follow the example set by their mostly-Jewish forebears in the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution in Russia and unleash a similar revolution in America is that they don't need a Leon Trotsky (birth name Lev Bronstein) or a Feliks Dzerzhinski to get the job done (it is well-known that the "godfather" of the American neocon movement, Irving Kristol, was once a Trotskyite). They use corporations as proxy enforcers of political correctness. Many Americans lose their jobs daily - not because of on-the-job misbehavior, incompetency, or redundancy - but because they do or say something politically incorrect off the job. And employers are imposing increasingly draconian restrictions on employee activities off the job. Some employers won't even allow employees to smoke off the job - even if the employee offers to pay more for health insurance. At-will employment permits these abuses. And now, corporations are incorporating political agendas into customer service.

One of the major corporate abusers is Citigroup. In a previous post, I documented how one of its subsidiaries, Citibank, abuses ordinary individual customers. However, in this post, I document how another of Citigroup's subsidiaries, Citicorp, is abusing business customers. The AccurateShooter.com website reports on how Citicorp suddenly decided to stop processing gun-related customer credit card sales, and how CDNN Sports, Inc. became their first victim.

The NSSF [National Shooting Sports Foundation] reports that Citicorp’s Merchant Services Division is refusing to process gun-related customer credit-card sales. This applies both to legal firearms transactions conducted through licensed FFLs [Federal Firearms Licensees] as well as ordinary sales of firearms accessories. The first company to be affected by this decision appears to be firearms distributor CDNN Sports, a large retail operation based in Texas. Citi Merchant Services and First Data notified CDNN that its merchant services account would be terminated and funds seized. (Citicorp Merchant Services employs First Data Merchant Services Corporation to handle credit card transactions.)

Charlie Crawford, president of CDNN Sports Inc., explained: “We were contacted recently by First Data/Citi Merchant Services by a June Rivera-Mantilla stating that we were terminated and funds were being seized for selling firearms in a non-face-to-face transaction. Although perfectly legal, we were also informed that no transactions would be processed in the future, even for non-firearms.”

If you have a Citigroup credit card, or use Citibank for your banking services, you may want to consider shifting your accounts to another financial services provider — and be sure you tell the Citibank representatives why you are making the shift. If gun owners act in solidarity, other credit card companies may think twice about following Citigroup’s lead in refusing to handle gun transactions. To voice your concern to Citi Merchant Services and First Data Corp. directly, you can contact June Rivera-Mantilla at 631-683-7734 or Robert Tenenbaum at 631-683-6570.

If you run a firearms-related business and wish to shift to an NSSF-affiliated credit card processing program, contact
Payment Alliance International at 1-866-371-2273 (ext. 1131).


You can also visit the BoycottCitibank.com website for even more information on action you can take as an individual.

You see what's happened here? Citicorp decided to act as its own judge, jury and executioner, even though they have no statutory power under the law. Instead of giving CDNN advance notice that they would stop processing gun-related customer credit-card sales in the future, they immediately put a stop to it, and freeze the company's funds at the same time. That's theft, as far as I'm concerned. I don't care if it's legal - it's still immoral, and we've got to put some morality back into the marketplace.

But what business does Citigroup have refusing to associate itself with gun sales in the first place? Sure, they can do it if they want, particularly if they give prominent notice, but what's the point? The point is, they're allowing themselves to be used to backdoor more gun control upon us.

And there have been other questionable tactics by Citibank. On January 3rd, they announced they were imposing more stringent limits on how much one could withdraw from one of their ATMs in New York City at a given time. The official excuse was to "reduce fraud". However, in context with Citibank's other customer abuses, once must question Citibank's motives, even if, in this case, they may have been salutory.

A commenter on the AccurateShooter.com website (comment #8) speculates that Citicorp may be under international pressure to take these measures, based on an article in the U.K. Daily Telegraph, but other than the idea that the major banks might be trying to "hoard" money, I see very little connection.

The bottom line is that Citibank has become an untrustworthy predator who will make up the rules as they go along and blindside you. At the earliest opportunity, get your money out of Citibank and into a more reputable institution. Banks that prey upon their customers must pay an economic price.

1 comment:

shannon said...

i had heard of citibank rejecting firearms credit card processing for internet sales, even though the sales are completely legal. i guess i understand why they feel they have some kind of liability, but i think that stopping processing for these transactions all together is kind of harsh. couldn't they have come up with a better solution?